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Lymphoid Neoplasia: Genetics of Predisposition and Precursors - Live Q&A

PhD Trainee
Sponsor: Scientific Committee on Lymphoid Neoplasia
Program: Scientific Program
Hematology Disease Topics & Pathways:
Fundamental Science, Genomics, Immunology, Diseases, Lymphoid Malignancies, Biological Processes
Sunday, December 12, 2021: 9:30 AM-10:15 AM
Sidney Marcus Auditorium, Level 4, Building A (Georgia World Congress Center)

Description:
Genetics play a major role in lymphomagenesis.  For inherited genetic factors, a number of large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified variants associated with risk of lymphoma and lymphoma subtypes.  It is interesting to note the heterogeneity of inherited common variants across lymphoma subtypes and the contribution of rare inherited variants in lymphoma etiology.  Similarly, evidence on genetic contributions to lymphoma precursor conditions is growing.  Recent studies have reported the role of common inherited variants as well as acquired variants from next generation sequencing in lymphoma precursor conditions.  These studies are now providing insight into the genetic role across the continuum of normal to precursor condition to lymphoma development.   

Dr. James Cerhan will discuss the role of inherited variants that have the potential to cause lymphoma.  He will provide an overview of genomic studies including the impact of rare and common variants. He will then dive into the commonalities and heterogeneity across lymphoma subtypes and end with the current status of translating these inherited variants to the clinic. 

Dr. Geffen Kleinstern will discuss the role of inherited variants with risk of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL), the precursor to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). She will also present results on the role of acquired variants with progression from MBL to CLL.  She will provide details of two genomic scores comprised of the inherited or somatic variants, respectively, and their impact on etiology of MBL and on outcome among individuals with MBL.  

Dr. Sandrine Roulland will discuss the role of early lesions in the development of follicular lymphoma (FL).  She will discuss the genetic landscape of FL common precursor cells (CPC) as well as the role of transcriptome and epigenomic changes.  She will also discuss the role of the microenvironment on CPC and possible opportunities for novel therapy.  

Chair:
Susan L. Slager, PhD, Mayo Clinic
Disclosures:
No relevant conflicts of interest to declare.
Panelists:
James R. Cerhan, MD, PhD, Mayo Clinic , Geffen Kleinstern, PhD, University of Haifa and Sandrine Roulland, PhD, Centre d' Immunologie de Marseille - Luminy
Disclosures:
Cerhan: Genentech: Research Funding; NanoString: Research Funding; Celgene/BMS: Other: Connect Lymphoma Scientific Steering Committee, Research Funding; Regeneron Genetics Center: Other: Research Collaboration. Roulland: BMS: Research Funding.
Genetics play a major role in lymphomagenesis.  For inherited genetic factors, a number of large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified variants associated with risk of lymphoma and lymphoma subtypes.  It is interesting to note the heterogeneity of inherited common variants across lymphoma subtypes and the contribution of rare inherited variants in lymphoma etiology.  Similarly, evidence on genetic contributions to lymphoma precursor conditions is growing.  Recent studies have reported the role of common inherited variants as well as acquired variants from next generation sequencing in lymphoma precursor conditions.  These studies are now providing insight into the genetic role across the continuum of normal to precursor condition to lymphoma development.   

Dr. James Cerhan will discuss the role of inherited variants that have the potential to cause lymphoma.  He will provide an overview of genomic studies including the impact of rare and common variants. He will then dive into the commonalities and heterogeneity across lymphoma subtypes and end with the current status of translating these inherited variants to the clinic. 

Dr. Geffen Kleinstern will discuss the role of inherited variants with risk of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL), the precursor to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). She will also present results on the role of acquired variants with progression from MBL to CLL.  She will provide details of two genomic scores comprised of the inherited or somatic variants, respectively, and their impact on etiology of MBL and on outcome among individuals with MBL.  

Dr. Sandrine Roulland will discuss the role of early lesions in the development of follicular lymphoma (FL).  She will discuss the genetic landscape of FL common precursor cells (CPC) as well as the role of transcriptome and epigenomic changes.  She will also discuss the role of the microenvironment on CPC and possible opportunities for novel therapy.  

See more of: Scientific Program