-Author name in bold denotes the presenting author
-Asterisk * with author name denotes a Non-ASH member
Clinically Relevant Abstract denotes an abstract that is clinically relevant.

PhD Trainee denotes that this is a recommended PHD Trainee Session.

Ticketed Session denotes that this is a ticketed session.

1649 A Phase II Study of Daratumumab in Patients with High-Risk MGUS and Low-Risk Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

Program: Oral and Poster Abstracts
Session: 653. Myeloma and Plasma Cell Dyscrasias: Clinical-Prospective Therapeutic Trials: Poster I
Hematology Disease Topics & Pathways:
Clinical Trials, Workforce, Plasma Cell Disorders, Diseases, Lymphoid Malignancies
Saturday, December 11, 2021, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Omar Nadeem, MD1, Robert A. Redd, MS2*, Michael Z. Koontz, MD3, Jeffrey V. Matous, MD4, Andrew J. Yee, MD5, Jeffrey A. Zonder, MD6, Andrew Kin, MD7, Jacalyn Rosenblatt, MD8, Julia Prescott, MSN, NP9*, Kelsey Tague10*, Veronica Romines10*, Meredith Bertoni10*, Amada Metivier10*, Rebekah Medina10*, Alexandra Savell, BS9*, Houry Leblebjian, PharmD, BCOP11*, Alexandra Distaso12*, Clifton C Mo, MD12*, Jacob P. Laubach, MD13, Adam S. Sperling, MD, PhD14, Paul G. Richardson, MD15 and Irene M. Ghobrial, MD16

1Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
2Department of Data Science, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
3Pacific Cancer Care, Morgan Hill, CA
4Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Colorado Blood Cancer Institute, Denver, CO
5Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA
6Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI
7Department of Oncology, Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Program, Karmanos Cancer Institute/ Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
8Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA
9Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
10Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston
11Department of Pharmacy, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
12Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
13The LeBow Institute for Myeloma Therapeutics and Jerome Lipper Myeloma Center, Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Newton, MA
14Division of Hematology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
15Dana-farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Ctr, Boston, MA
16Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Introduction: Daratumumab (Dara) is an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody that is approved for use in patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed multiple myeloma (MM). We hypothesized that early therapeutic intervention with Dara in patients with high-risk MGUS (HR-MGUS) or low-risk SMM (LR-SMM) would lead to eradication of the tumor clone by achieving deep responses, resulting in prevention of progression to MM. We present results of our phase II, single arm study of Dara in HR-MGUS and LR-SMM.

Methods: Patients enrolled on this study met eligibility for either HR-MGUS or LR-SMM. HR-MGUS is defined as <10% bone marrow plasma cells and <3g/dL M protein and at least 2 of the following 3 high-risk criteria: Abnormal serum free light chain ratio (SFLC) of <0.26 or >1.65, M protein ≥ 1.5g/dL or non-IgG M protein. LR-SMM is defined by one of the following 3 criteria: M protein ≥3g/dL, ≥10% bone marrow plasma cells, SFLC ratio <0.125 or >8. Dara (16mg/kg) was administered intravenously on a weekly schedule for cycles 1-2, every other week cycles 3-6, and monthly during cycles 7-20. The primary objective of this study was to determine the proportion of patients who achieve very good partial response (VGPR) or greater after 20 cycles of Dara. Secondary objectives included duration of response, safety, and rates of minimal residual disease (MRD)-negativity in VGPR or greater patients. Correlative studies included assessing changes in immune microenvironment, evaluating clonal heterogeneity using deep sequencing, and determining association of genomic aberrations correlating with either response to therapy or progression of disease.

Results: At the time of data cutoff, a total of 42 patients were enrolled on this study from 2018 to 2020 with participation of 5 sites. The median age for all patients at enrolment was 60 years (range 38 to 76), with 22 males (52.4%) and 20 females (47.6%). Majority of patients enrolled were classified as LR-SMM (n = 37, 88.1%) and the remaining 5 patients had HR-MGUS (11.9%).

41 patients have started treatment and are included in toxicity assessment, and 40 patients have at least completed 16 cycles (range 6-20). Grade 3 toxicities were rare and only experienced in 5/41 patients including diarrhea (n =1/41; 2%), flu like symptoms (n = 1/41; 2%), headache (n=1/41; 2%), and hypertension (n=2/41; 5%). Most common toxicities of any grade included fatigue (n = 24/41, 51%), cough (n = 19/41, 46%), nasal congestion (n = 18/41, 44%), headache (n = 14/41, 34%), hypertension (n = 11/41, 27%), nausea (n = 13/41, 32%), and leukopenia (n = 13/41, 32%). No patients have discontinued therapy due to toxicity.

Minimal response or better was observed in 82.9% of patients (34/41) and PR or better was observed in 51.2% of patients (21/41). This included overall CR (n = 4, 9.8%), VGPR (n = 1, 2.4%), PR (n = 16, 39.0%), MR (n = 13, 31.7%), and SD (n = 7, 17.1%). In the 40 patients who completed at least 16 cycles, response rates were as follows: MR or better 85% (34/40), PR or better 52.5% (21/40) and VGPR or better 12.5% (5/40). Median time to VGPR was 7 months. Median overall survival and progression-free survival have not been reached and no patients have progressed to overt multiple myeloma while on study.

Conclusion: Dara is very well tolerated among patients with HR-MGUS and LR-SMM with minimal toxicities. Responses are seen in majority of patients. Early therapeutic intervention in this precursor patient population appears promising but longer follow up is required to define the role of single agent Dara in preventing progression to MM, therefore avoiding more toxic interventions in this low-risk patient population.

Disclosures: Nadeem: Karyopharm: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; GSK: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Adaptive Biotechnologies: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; BMS: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Yee: GSK: Consultancy; Oncopeptides: Consultancy; Janssen: Consultancy; Amgen: Consultancy; Sanofi: Consultancy; Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy; Adaptive: Consultancy; Takeda: Consultancy; Karyopharm: Consultancy. Zonder: Caelum Biosciences: Consultancy; Amgen: Consultancy; BMS: Consultancy, Research Funding; Intellia: Consultancy; Alnylam: Consultancy; Janssen: Consultancy; Takeda: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Regeneron: Consultancy. Rosenblatt: Attivare Therapeutics: Consultancy; Imaging Endpoints: Consultancy; Parexel: Consultancy; Karyopharm: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Bristol-Myers Squibb: Research Funding; Wolters Kluwer Health: Consultancy, Patents & Royalties. Mo: AbbVIE: Consultancy; BMS: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Eli Lilly: Consultancy; Epizyme: Consultancy; GSK: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Janssen: Honoraria; Karyopharm: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sanofi: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Sperling: Adaptive: Consultancy. Richardson: Karyopharm: Consultancy, Research Funding; AstraZeneca: Consultancy; AbbVie: Consultancy; Takeda: Consultancy, Research Funding; Celgene/BMS: Consultancy, Research Funding; Janssen: Consultancy; GlaxoSmithKline: Consultancy; Protocol Intelligence: Consultancy; Secura Bio: Consultancy; Regeneron: Consultancy; Sanofi: Consultancy; Oncopeptides: Consultancy, Research Funding; Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Research Funding. Ghobrial: AbbVie, Adaptive, Aptitude Health, BMS, Cellectar, Curio Science, Genetch, Janssen, Janssen Central American and Caribbean, Karyopharm, Medscape, Oncopeptides, Sanofi, Takeda, The Binding Site, GNS, GSK: Consultancy.

*signifies non-member of ASH