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82 Daratumumab (DARA) with Bortezomib, Thalidomide, and Dexamethasone (VTd) in Transplant-Eligible Patients (Pts) with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma (NDMM): Analysis of Minimal Residual Disease (MRD) Negativity in Cassiopeia Part 1 and Part 2

Program: Oral and Poster Abstracts
Type: Oral
Session: 653. Myeloma and Plasma Cell Dyscrasias: Clinical-Prospective Therapeutic Trials: Phase 2 and 3 Trials in Myeloma
Hematology Disease Topics & Pathways:
Clinical Trials, Biological, Adults, Clinical Research, Plasma Cell Disorders, Diseases, Therapies, Lymphoid Malignancies, Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Study Population
Saturday, December 11, 2021: 10:45 AM

Herve Avet Loiseau, MD, PhD1, Pieter Sonneveld2, Philippe Moreau, MD, PhD3*, Fritz Offner, MD, PhD4, Vincent H.J. van der Velden, PhD5*, Denis Caillot, MD6*, Cyrille Hulin7*, Bertrand Arnulf, MD8*, Jill Corre1*, Mohamad Mohty, MD, PhD9, Lionel Karlin10*, Jérôme Lambert, MD, PhD11*, Margaret Macro12*, Aurore Perrot13*, Mark-David Levin, MD, PhD14, Saskia K. Klein, MD, PhD15*, Anne-Marie Stoppa16*, Michel Delforge17*, Sonja Zweegman18, Kon-Siong Jie, MD19, Niels W.C.J. Van De Donk20, Maria Krevvata, PhD21*, Fabio Rigat22*, Shiyi Yang21*, Veronique Vanquickelberghe23*, Carla de Boer24*, Tobias Kampfenkel24, Jessica Vermeulen24, Soraya Wuillème, PharmD, PhD25*, Annemiek Broyl26* and Marie C Bene, PharmD, DPhil25*

1Unite de Genomique du Myelome, IUC-Oncopole, Toulouse, France
2Erasmus University Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands
3Hematology, University Hospital Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes, France
4Hematology, University Hospital Ghent, Gent, Belgium
5Department of Immunology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
6CHU Dijon, Hôpital Du Bocage, Dijon, France
7Department of Hematology, Hôpital Haut Lévêque, University Hospital, Pessac, France
8Immuno-Hématologie, Hopital Saint Louis, APHP, Paris, France
9Hospital Saint-Antoine, Sorbonne University, Paris, France
10Department of Hematology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pierre-Bénite, France
11Biostatistical Department, Hôpital Saint Louis, Paris, France
12Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) de Caen, Caen, France
13CHU de Toulouse, IUCT-O, Université de Toulouse, UPS, Service d’Hématologie, Toulouse, France
14Department of Internal Medicine, Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Dordrecht, Netherlands
15Department of Hematology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
16Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille, France
17Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
18Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Department of Hematology, Amsterdam, Netherlands
19Zuyderland MC, Sittard, Netherlands
20Department of Hematology, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
21Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Spring House, PA
22Janssen-Cilag Limited, High Wycombe, United Kingdom
23Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Beerse, Belgium
24Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Leiden, Netherlands
25Hematology Biology, University Hospital Hôtel Dieu, Nantes, France
26Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands

Introduction: The 2-part phase 3 CASSIOPEIA study (NCT02541383) investigated the combination of DARA with VTd (D-VTd) in transplant-eligible NDMM pts. D-VTd induction/consolidation (ind/cons) led to increased rates of MRD negativity and prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) compared with VTd (Moreau P, et al. Lancet. 2019;394(10192):29-38). In Part 2, DARA as post-autologous stem cell therapy (ASCT) maintenance significantly improved PFS in pts who received VTd ind/cons. Most common (≥2.5%) grade 3/4 adverse events included pneumonia (DARA: 2.5%; observation [OBS]: 1.4%), lymphopenia (3.6%; 1.8%), and hypertension (3.0%; 1.6%; Moreau P, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2021;39(no. 15_suppl):8004). Here, we present results from a detailed analysis of MRD negativity.

Methods: Eligible pts were 18-65 years of age, had NDMM and were ASCT eligible. Pts were randomized 1:1 to 4 (28-day) cycles of pre-ASCT induction and 2 (28-day) cycles of post-ASCT consolidation with D-VTd or VTd (bortezomib, 1.3 mg/m2 SC on Days 1, 4, 8, 11; thalidomide, 100 mg PO daily; dexamethasone, 20-40 mg IV/PO; ± DARA, 16 mg/kg IV weekly (QW) in Cycles 1-2, Q2W in Cycles 3-6). Pts who completed consolidation and achieved partial response or better were re-randomized 1:1 to maintenance DARA at reduced intensity (DARA, 16 mg/kg Q8W) for a maximum of 2 years, or OBS. Samples were collected for MRD analysis at predefined timepoints from all pts regardless of response to ind/cons and in pts with very good partial response or better during maintenance. The primary MRD assessment methodology was multiparametric flow cytometry during ind/cons and next-generation sequencing during maintenance, each at the 10–5 threshold. MRD negativity is reported here for pts who achieved complete response or better.

Results: 1,085 pts were randomized to ind/cons (D-VTd, n=543 or VTd, n=542) and 886 pts were re-randomized for post-ASCT maintenance (DARA, n=442 or OBS, n=444). The rate of MRD negativity was higher with D-VTd than with VTd following induction (9.2% vs 5.4%; odds ratio [OR], 1.79; P=0.0150) and consolidation (33.7% vs 19.9%; OR, 2.06; P<0.0001). Sustained MRD-negativity was higher in the D-VTd group compared to VTd at 1-year (50.1% vs 30.1%; OR, 2.37; P<0.0001) and at 2 years (35.5% vs 18.8%; OR, 2.41; P<0.0001). Among pts who were at risk of progression 1 or 2 years after induction, those who achieved, respectively, 1- or 2-years sustained MRD negativity from post-induction, showed improved PFS over pts who did not, regardless of treatment (1yr sustained: HR, 0.20; P<0.0001; 2yr sustained: HR, 0.08; P<0.0001). D-VTd pts at risk who achieved 1- or 2-years sustained MRD negativity from post-induction showed improved PFS over D-VTd pts who did not (1yr sustained: HR, 0.20; P<0.0001; 2yr sustained: HR, 0.04; P<0.0001). VTd pts at risk who achieved 1- or 2-years sustained MRD negativity from post-induction showed improved PFS over VTd pts who did not (1yr sustained: HR, 0.40; P=0.0030; 2yr sustained: HR, 0.22; P<0.0046; Figure).

During maintenance, the rate of MRD negativity significantly favored DARA over OBS (58.6% vs 47.1%; OR, 1.80; P=0.0001). In pts who received D-VTd ind/cons, the MRD-negativity rates with DARA and OBS were 64.2% and 57.6% respectively (OR, 1.43; P=0.1037). In contrast, pts who had received VTd ind/cons showed significantly higher MRD-negativity rates during DARA maintenance vs OBS (52.6% vs 35.8%; OR, 2.26; P=0.0002). The rates of sustained MRD negativity in the D-VTd group were not significantly different with DARA vs OBS (1yr sustained: 48.5% vs 41.0%; OR, 1.41; P=0.0885; 2yr sustained: 28.8% vs 21.8%; OR, 1.47; P=0.0789). In the VTd group, the 1-year sustained MRD-negativity rate was significantly higher with DARA vs OBS (35.7% vs 21.4%; OR, 2.22; P=0.0006) but no difference was observed in the 2-year sustained MRD rate (11.3% vs 13.0%; OR, 0.83; P=0.5481).

Conclusion: In CASSIOPEIA, the highest and most durable rates of MRD negativity were achieved after D-VTd ind/ASCT/cons and DARA maintenance. Reduced intensity (Q8W) DARA maintenance did not significantly improve MRD negativity compared to OBS in patients treated with D-VTd. In patients treated with VTd, DARA maintenance did improve MRD negativity, but this effect was not long lasting. Longer follow-up is required to assess the potential long-term benefits of sustained MRD negativity for DARA vs OBS after D-VTd.

Disclosures: Sonneveld: Karyopharm: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding; Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding; SkylineDx: Honoraria, Research Funding; Celgene/BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding; Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding; Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding. Moreau: Amgen: Honoraria; Janssen: Honoraria; Celgene BMS: Honoraria; Sanofi: Honoraria; Abbvie: Honoraria; Oncopeptides: Honoraria. van der Velden: Janssen: Other: Service Level Agreement; BD Biosciences: Other: Service Level Agreement; Navigate: Other: Service Level Agreement; Agilent: Research Funding; EuroFlow: Other: Service Level Agreement, Patents & Royalties: for network, not personally. Hulin: abbvie: Honoraria; Sanofi: Honoraria; Celgene/BMS: Honoraria; Janssen: Honoraria; Takeda: Honoraria. Arnulf: Janssen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Celene/BMS: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Mohty: Sanofi: Honoraria, Research Funding; Pfizer: Honoraria; Novartis: Honoraria; Takeda: Honoraria; Jazz: Honoraria, Research Funding; Janssen: Honoraria, Research Funding; Gilead: Honoraria; Celgene: Honoraria, Research Funding; Bristol Myers Squibb: Honoraria; Astellas: Honoraria; Amgen: Honoraria; Adaptive Biotechnologies: Honoraria. Karlin: Janssen: Honoraria, Other: member of advisory board, travel support; Abbvie: Honoraria; Amgen: Honoraria, Other: travel support and advisory board ; Sanofi: Honoraria; Takeda: Honoraria, Other: member of advisory board; Celgene-BMS: Honoraria, Other: member of advisory board; GSK: Honoraria, Other: member of advisory board; oncopeptide: Honoraria. Macro: Sanofi: Honoraria; GSK: Honoraria; Takeda: Honoraria, Other: Travel accomodation, Research Funding; Janssen: Honoraria, Other: Travel accomodation, Research Funding; Celgen/BMS: Honoraria. Perrot: GSK: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Janssen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; BMS Celgene: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Amgen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Abbvie: Honoraria; Sanofi: Honoraria, Research Funding; Takeda: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Levin: Roche, Janssen, Abbvie: Other: Travel Expenses, Ad-Board. Delforge: Amgen, Celgene, Janssen, Sanofi: Honoraria, Research Funding. Zweegman: Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; BMS: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sanofi: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Oncopeptides: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Janssen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Van De Donk: BMS/Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria; Janssen: Consultancy, Research Funding; Amgen: Consultancy, Research Funding; Cellectis: Research Funding; Takeda: Consultancy; Roche: Consultancy; Novartis /bayer/servier: Consultancy. Krevvata: Janssen: Current Employment. Rigat: Janssen: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Yang: Janssen: Current Employment. Vanquickelberghe: Janssen: Current Employment. de Boer: Janssen: Current Employment. Kampfenkel: Janssen: Current Employment. Vermeulen: Janssen: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Broyl: Celgene: Honoraria; Janssen Pharmaceuticals: Honoraria; Sanofi: Honoraria; Bristol-Meyer Squibb: Honoraria; Amgen: Honoraria.

OffLabel Disclosure: The specific regimen combination is not yet approved in the maintenance setting.

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