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4796 Patient Reported Financial Toxicity in Acute LeukemiaClinically Relevant Abstract

Program: Oral and Poster Abstracts
Session: 902. Health Services Research—Malignant Diseases: Poster III
Hematology Disease Topics & Pathways:
Clinically relevant, Quality Improvement
Monday, December 3, 2018, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM
Hall GH (San Diego Convention Center)

Thomas G. Knight, MD1, Myra Robinson, MS2*, Michael R. Grunwald, MD1, Lauren M. Bohannon2*, Erin Blackwell, RN, BSN, OCN3*, Jing Ai, MD1, Brittany Ragon, MD1, Rhonda Davis, BSN, RN3*, Cindy Shiflett, LPN3*, Erica Ruston, RN, BSN3*, Jigar Trivedi, MSc, PharmD4*, Justin Arnall, PharmD, CPP, BCOP4*, Belinda Rene Avalos, MD1, James T Symanowski, PhD2*, Edward A. Copelan, MD1 and Jonathan M. Gerber, MD1

1Department of Hematologic Oncology and Blood Disorders, Levine Cancer Institute, Atrium Health, Charlotte, NC
2Department of Cancer Biostatistics, Levine Cancer Institute, Atrium Health, Charlotte, NC
3Levine Cancer Institute, Atrium Health, Charlotte, NC
4Department of Pharmacy, Levine Cancer Institute, Atrium Health, Charlotte, NC

Background:

Financial Toxicity (FT) is increasingly recognized as a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in a variety of cancers. Treatment of acute leukemia is associated with heavy healthcare utilization and high costs. The purpose of this study was to define rates, risk factors, and mortality implications for FT in patients with acute leukemia using patient reported data.

Methods:

All patients seen at the Levine Cancer Institute, a tertiary hospital-based leukemia practice, were surveyed prior to each visit over a six-month period. All patients were aged ≥18 years and were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The survey consisted of the PROMIS Global-10 measure and two questions from the COST measure. FT was defined as scoring 4 or less (maximum: 10) in agreement with the COST questions: “I know that I have enough money in savings, retirement, or assets to cover the costs of my treatment” and “I am satisfied with my current financial situation.” Demographic data and disease characteristics were abstracted from the medical record. Model selection was carried out using logistic regression to identify factors impacting the incidence of financial toxicity. Correlation of numerical financial toxicity scores with PROMIS scores and with mortality data was assessed using linear regression.

Results:

Of the 106 patients, 58 (54%) met the definition of exhibiting FT. The factors associated with incidence of FT included: age, race, and insurance type. The odds of FT in those patients <65 years of age were 2.7 times the odds of FT in those ≥65, adjusting for race, insurance, and time since first treatment (95% CI: 0.884 – 8.438, p = .081). The odds of FT in African American patients were 4.3 times the odds of FT in Caucasian patients, adjusting for age, insurance, and time since first treatment (CI: 0.408 – 44.824, p = .150). The odds of FT in patients with Medicaid insurance were 14.2 times the odds of FT in patients with commercial insurance, adjusting for age, race, and time since first treatment (CI: 1.658 – 121.862, p = .106). Gender, distance from the hospital, type of acute leukemia, history of blood/marrow transplant, and history of relapsed disease were not found to be significant. There was a significant correlation for both the PROMIS global physical (p < .001) and mental (p < .001) scores with the FT score. Lower FT score (higher degree of FT) was associated with lower mental and physical scores. There was no statistically significant difference in survival between patients with FT scores >4 compared to patients with FT scores <=4; however, there was a trend toward decreased survival in those with lower FT scores (Figures 1 and 2).

Conclusions:

Patients with acute leukemia represent an extremely vulnerable population for financial toxicity with rates of distress even higher than other reported malignancies. Urgent interventions are indicated in this population.

Disclosures: Grunwald: Medtronic: Equity Ownership; Cardinal Health: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Genentech: Research Funding; Merck: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Forma Therapeutics: Research Funding; Janssen: Research Funding; Incyte Corporation: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Alexion: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Pfizer: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Ariad: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Agios: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Amgen: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Celgene: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Avalos: Juno: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Symanowski: Five Prime Therapeutics: Other: Data Safety Monitoring Board ; Boston Biomedical: Other: Data Safety Monitoring Board ; Eli Lily & Co: Other: Data Safety Monitoring Board; Immatics: Other: Data Safety Monitoring Board.

*signifies non-member of ASH